Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Rose Petals: smell good, feel good and taste good

WOW! Rosewater really comes from roses.
I love cosmetics. I really do. I have never seen a Lancome deal that couldn’t seduce me, or an Ulta store that didn’t sing a siren’s song for me.

BUT I hate spending the money for things that should be simple and pure. Yes, I am conflicted.

One thing that really irritates me is toner. Really good for your skin, but geez, why so much for what looks like just water, right? I set off to research why, and how I could avoid that expense.

The answers I found were so simple I am embarrassed to say. No I am not telling all, but I will say that anyone can make the following toner at home.

The distilled rose water can also be used in many deserts, marmalades or other such goodies.

Here’s what you will need.

• A BIG stainless steel or enamel pot with lid

• Fresh picked rose petals, or some that have been recently picked and refrigerated.

• A brick

• Stainless steel bowl that fits inside the pot

• Water
• A bag of ice

• A clean glass bottle or jar

Put the brick into the pot, and surround it with rose petals.

Put in cold water to just cover the petals.

Put the bowl in the pot, and then cover with the upside down lid.

Bring up to a slow boil and then reduce heat to a simmer.

When it starts to boil, put a few trays of ice in the upside down lid. Voila! You have created a still, crude but effective. When the steam hits the lid filled with ice it will condense and fall into the bowl.

Every now and then remove the rose water that has condensed into the bowl, and fill a clear glass container. You can keep in the fridge. Depending on what you will use it for, put a few drops of witch hazel or white vinegar to make it last longer. I use witch hazel drops to use as a face toner.

Do you think Lancome will miss me?


  1. Sharon this looks so cool. I had no idea this could be done at home. What a cool DIY project. I have pretty sensitive/reactive skin - I'll bet homemade toner would help. I assume we need to be careful to use only organic roses that haven't been sprayed with pesticides and such, right?

  2. Jacquie, yes the best are unsprayed. But even still, these are "boiled" so you are literally distilling the water. Pretty much killing anything toxic.